Osher Günsberg reveals his darkest days dealing with mental illness

Sarah Carty
Senior Lifestyle & Entertainment Producer


Osher Günsberg has opened up about his darkest hours dealing with mental illness, describing it as a ‘relentless terror’.

The Bachelor Australia host, who has been dealing with anxiety since 2007, said that it all came to a head when he was living in LA, just after the first season of The Bachelor wrapped up in 2013.

In an article he wrote for Ten Daily, Osher said he had come off his anti-depressants and was out for a run one day when suddenly everything ‘became too much’.

The Bachelor Australia host, Osher Günsberg, has opened up about his darkest hours dealing with mental illness, describing it as a ‘relentless terror’. Photo: Getty Images

“I descended rapidly into paranoid delusions which had me convinced that the world was going to end that very day — and I was the only one who knew about it,” Osher wrote.

“That afternoon I got to my doctor and started the long road back to sanity.

“It got worse before it got better, and in the darkest parts included enduring many months of active and passive suicidal ideation.”

After years of treatment, which includes antipsychotic drugs, exposure therapy and chats with a psychologist, Osher said he’s thankfully ‘okay’ at the moment.

He thanked his wife, Audrey Griffen, for her constant support over the years and hoped his openness about his experience will mental illness would help others in a similar position.

His article came just one day after his wife, Audrey, wrote her own piece for Ten Daily on what it’s like to live with someone who is living with anxiety.

His article came just one day after his wife, Audrey Griffen, revealed what it’s like to live with someone who is living with anxiety. Photo: Instagram/AudreyGriffen


Audrey met her TV host hubby on the set of the first season of The Bachelor back in 2015 and said from the beginning he was always “open and honest about his state of mind”.

The makeup artist said that even though she knew what Osher was going through, some days it felt as if she was “living with another man”, one who was filled with pain and who coped by pushing her away.

Despite it being tough, she said she would remind herself that his actions were being driven by his anxiety and fears and focus on that.

Audrey said the pair are now in a ‘healthier space’ but it can still be a rollercoaster ride for her and daughter Georgia, who do their best to support him.

Osher has credited his wife in the past for bringing him back from the edge, telling the Daily Telegraph last year he was so grateful” ‘for all she has done.

If you’re experiencing feelings of anxiety or depression contact Beyond Blue, Batyr or PANDA for support.

If you are concerned about the mental health of yourself or a loved one, seek support and information by calling Lifeline on 13 11 14, Mensline on 1300 789 978, or Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800